The Power Of #Music

Music must have been inspired from the spontaneous sounds of nature around us – the rustling of leaves, the whispering of pines, the rippling of rivers, the gurgling of waterfalls…the cooing of pigeons, the roaring of lions…

The sounds and rhythms that emanate from earth and sky, from mountains and rivers, from forests and seas must have stimulated the flow of musical notes.

First musical instrument is said to be the human voice – which can make a number of sounds like humming, whistling, clicking and singing.

“Music is the literature of the heart; it commences where speech ends.” –Alphonse de Lamartine.

I have always felt the truth of these words. Music has been my most natural refuge, my beloved book of literature; I could feel its emotive effect even as a child. I could speak to it, I could drown my sorrows in its ever-flowing strains and absorb all the wisdom from the lyrics.

It has always assuaged my lacerations, brightened my hours, added glow to my little joys and given wings to my fantasy flights. Music speaks to us, it whispers sweet melodious sounds into our ears. 

Even now, whenever I feel like dropping out of this world, I go to my favorite music. All my dreams and reflections merge into those trills floating around me and I feel at ease.

The power of music transcends beyond just entertainment:

  • It elevates our mood.
  • It educates and inspires.
  • It enhances our creativity.
  • It increases our emotional sensitivity
  • It acquaints us with rhythm and harmony.
  • It makes us happy.
  • It relaxes and calms our mind and nerves.
  • It gives solace and serenity.
  • It is a natural healer.

Music therapy has been used for times immemorial and more recently for psychiatric disorders, medical problems, developmental disabilities, substance abuse, communication disorders, interpersonal problems and aging.

It is also used to improve learning, build self-esteem and reduce stress. Even plants respond to good music and grow better.

Whether it is traditional music or modern, all age groups have felt its power since the beginning of human existence.

Which music is good music?

Though it depends on your own choice and mood but good music, to my mind, leaves an eternal effect, it becomes ‘a bliss of solitude’…we wish to return to it again and again, to experience that calming effect.

Music that is rattling and foot tapping gives momentary joy, which wears off just like the modern intoxicants.

If you meet it just for entertainment, it’s thrilling.

If you approach it for aesthetic pleasure, it’s ecstatic.

If you seek spiritual solace from it, it’s blissful.

Which kind of music do you like? I would love to hear your views.

(Pulled out from my archives)

© Balroop Singh

Thank you. 

If you like poetry: click here to hear Magical Whispers

Have you checked my latest release? – Slivers: Chiseled Poetry

43 thoughts on “The Power Of #Music

  1. I’ve surrounded myself with music since I was a child, Balroop. There are several musicians in my family, though sadly, that particular talent passed me by. I do, however, enjoy immersing myself in it, and I love multiple types–everything from contemporary, jazz, and folk to new age and instrumental. Even as I’m typing this reply, I have music on in the background.
    Wonderful post!

    1. The background music is reaching me through your words! Listening and admiring good music is also a talent Mae, all people don’t possess it. Understanding the finer nuances needs immersion! Stay blessed.

  2. Music has always been an integral part of human existence. Even now whether it is tribals or most advanced societies, music is a big refuge and a proven way to unwind. Natural sounds like waterfall or birds chirping are some of the most soulful. Of course, now we have many compositions that replicate natural forest sounds. Great post, as always.

  3. I am a music lover as well, Balroop. I enjoy a variety of genres. Jazz, country, rock and aesthetic music (like rain sounds). Being in nature is truly the best music for the soul, though. Music brings us all together as there are few to none who would prefer silence. It’s nice you brought this post out of the archives. So much good stuff hiding in our old posts!

  4. I love this post, Balroop. I was drawn to music since I was a child. One piece of music I loved and turned out to be Carmen’s overture and I love opera ever since. My childhood friend became my piano teacher teaching me for free. I’m a singer. I entered the singing contest when I was in the fourth grade and got third place. My friend got first place. Her mom was our music teacher. Her mom played piano and her dad played violin. I took voice lessons for more than ten years and sang solo on many occasions such as weddings. I told my professor once that I listened to classical music to fill the caps when doing my study and reading, he said it filled in too many gaps for him!!

    1. Wow! Miriam, you are multi-talented! I too learnt music in childhood but it was cut short due to the tragic and untimely demise of my dad. He was a great music lover and I guess music is in my genes. 😊 Thanks for sharing your lovely memories.

  5. Great post, Balroop 🙂 I love all types of music depending on my mood. It can motivate me to clean the house or relax me and foster peace. I agree nature creates its own magical music.

  6. Your entire post felt enriching to read, I particularly found the first paragraph an impactful reminder of where music originated from – from the magnificent sounds of nature itself, including the human voice.

    1. Thank you Prag for such a beautiful response. Mother Nature has nurtured us in various ways and all good things come from her. Just sit in her lap and hear her melodies… so diverse!

  7. It is great to hear how you also love music, Balroop, and express it so eloquently. I have written a few posts on
    this subject too. Music is in all and I agree that it must have started with sounds from nature. Those sounds still fill me
    with such joy and peace.
    My music taste varies from many big classics, folk music, jazz, gospel, many of today’s composers….. . If they reach my heart they are good to me.
    Thank you for your lovely post.

    Miriam

  8. You describe music, and its importance, so beautifully Balroop. I enjoy all kinds, but often it depends on my mood, which kind I listen to. When I’m writing and relaxing, I listen to classical. Ode to Joy brings me to tears every time I listen to it. But I can get tearful at a Beatles tune, as well. I hop and bop to rockin’ music, and with my Zumba classes, I’ve recently learned to appreciate Latino music as well. I smiled last spring when I went to get my vaccination, which was set in a large hospital auditorium. They piped in classical music to soothe the ones nervous with needles. 🙂

    1. I like the way pianos have been placed in some hospitals to soothe the patients with soft music. I love soft music but then I can dance away with foot-tapping beats when the hour demands. Yes, the mood does matter! Thank you Pam, for sharing your love for music.

  9. I love music of all sorts and it is an international language, no words needed. From the robin in my garden to a full scale orchestra there is music for every mood, alone or sharing with many strangers.

  10. What a wonderful post, Balroop. I think you remember from reading my book that I used to sing in my youth, so music has always been an integral part of my life. Singing was my passion in those early years, but listening to music will always be part of my daily routine. I love the music of nature as you have described so well. But I also love country, pop, jazz, and rock n roll, depending on my mood and what I’m doing at the time. When my husband and I first started dating, along with into the early years of our marriage, we went dancing all the time. It was who we were and we couldn’t get enough of it. Even if I’m at a concert listening to great upbeat music, I can’t help but tap my foot to the beat. And I’m always perplexed at those who just sit still. I have to move when the music moves me. 🙂 Music is the universal language for all. Thank you for this beautiful post. 💕🎶

  11. I am relentlessly curious about the roots of music. You’ve given me a lot to think about. I do like a variety of music, depending upon my attitude. Thanks for such a scintillating post.

      1. I’ve added the rhytmic thumping of hands on the ground, hands on a hollow tree, humming… My trilogy from 850,000 years ago recognizes and replicates bird song but as voices… My folks 75,000 yo in my next trilogy I think should have music but I’m not sure.

  12. I think our heartbeat (or our mother’s) is the first music we hear/feel and that rhythm part of us – one of the reasons the sea is so soothing. I like lots of different kinds of music, Balroop (except maybe the screaming kind). But if it has rhythm, I’m all there. Beautiful post. 🙂

    1. Nice to see you back Diana, I hope you’ve enjoyed the music of Mother Nature in the most pristine surroundings. Thank you for sharing your thoughts about how music becomes a natural part of our lives.

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