Welcome to the “AMERICAN AGONY” Blog Tour @BorelMedWriter @4WillsPub

Am_Agony_Blog_Tour_PlacardPlease welcome my guest Helen Borel today with her enlightening book.

I truly appreciate my host for allowing me to introduce my new book, American AGONY: The Opioid War Against Patients in Pain, published by Fresh Ink Group. 

I wrote it in six tightly focused months because I felt compelled to follow up swiftly on the true-life horror stories increasingly reported on social media, on medical websites, and in personal communications from suffering and dying patients, victims of federal heavy-handed restrictions on prescription opioids.

Regarding the ethical treatment of patients in pain, America has arrived at an impasse.  Increasingly, patients with chronic incurable pain from various injuries, surgeries, and genetic conditions are having their years, and even decades, of well-working prescription narcotics being tapered to ineffective lower-dose levels or being suddenly cold-turkeyed altogether.  Results?  Severe 24/7 suffering of millions, suicides of thousands. This national outrage is caused by ignorant, non-medical bureaucrats running the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Veterans Administration (VA), the Department of Justice (DOJ), and the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) who’ve insinuated themselves into the most minute aspects of the doctor-patient relationship.

These entities began their onslaughts intensely in the last decade, especially the past three years. They have emboldened themselves to hound physicians so that amputee-Veterans can no longer get their prescription opioids from VA doctors. Other paincare facilities are shutting down, pain patients abandoned to zero treatment and zero referrals. They are spying on and raiding physicians’ practices. This is a medical emergency being overlooked by a heartless political system. Yet another epidemic—this time of patient suicides—is ignored by the CDC.

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Amazon link

Who are the patient groups affected?  It begins with the denial of well-working prescription opioids from those with lifelong pain conditions diagnosed as Intractable Pain Patients (IPPs).  Now neither you nor I can receive a medically indicated narcotic when we go to the ER with severe injuries, with a kidney stone scraping its way down a bleeding ureter, or with suffering postsurgical pain—not even root-canal surgery at our dentists’. It affects child patients. It even affects pets treated by veterinarians, suffering animals whose owners are feared might take the meds.

I call those who interfere with pain treatment “OxyMORONS” because of their opiophobic stupidity. They have clamped down so hard on normal opioid prescribing for pain that now even end-of-life, hospice care, and cancer patients are being denied relief. Family of terminal patients have even been told, “We fear he’ll become addicted.”

One example: the critical blood disorder Sickle Cell Disease, which causes misshapen erythrocytes (red blood cells) to threaten oxygen transport throughout the circulatory system, can be excruciating during a crisis. It requires emergency intravenous morphine in addition to the lifelong opioid such patients are normally managing on.  Shame on America for accusing so many of these patients as being “drug seekers.”As a published medical and pharmaceutical writer, and given my earlier career as a bedside hospital nurse with expertise in evaluating and medicating various kinds and levels of pain, I felt it my duty to expose these government injustices and cruelties, to research and write a book aimed at helping to restore normal, medically indicated opioid prescribing by physicians without interference by bureaucrats.

Thank you for giving me a platform to share this critical information that ultimately impacts everyone.

—Helen Borel, RN, MFA, PhD

Watch the trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MW-pmcAb4ZU

American-AGONY-Author-Photo-256x300About the Author: 

Dr. Helen Borel wrote poetry and played piano as a child growing up in two orphanages. She became a registered nurse, then earned her master’s in creative writing. After 18 years as a medical, psychiatric, and pharmaceutical copywriter, she published books, literary criticism, satire, and fiction. She became a doctor in psychoanalytical studies with her own website, PsychDocNYC.com. Always outspoken for the underdog, her intense research is the basis for her passionate expose of government wrongs and the legal rights pain victims must assert. Find her at PsychDocNYC.com and on Twitter: @BorelMedWriter or @PsychDocConnect.

To follow along with the rest of the tour, please visit the author’s tour page on the 4WillsPublishing site.  If you’d like to book your own blog tour and have your book promoted in similar fashion, please click HERE.

Thanks for supporting this author and her work!

 

 

The Emotional Aspect Of Grief, Which Later Became My Friend!

Grief

Grief…I have written a lot of poetry about this word, which ceased to be a word for me long back and became an ever-encompassing emotion, just like the threatening dark clouds, which refuse to break away without torrential rain.

I know this emotion is not individualistic. I know it is all pervading and agonizing but when it starts defining life for us at a very young age, it becomes a part of our personality.

That is how it assaulted me, devoid of any compassion with killer instinct to annihilate my existence.

I had to deal with it single-handed, finding excuses to hide away from it, putting up a brave front, denying its existence and even shoving it into the obscure corners of my mind.

We can do so when we are very young, burying our memories with the hope that they will remain repressed. Dwelling in the world of denial we move on, pursuing our dreams and basking in their glory.

Forgetting that no glory lasts forever. Oblivious of the reality that grief is an incessant stream that flows into our life time and again and brings all those boulders back, which we had discarded in the hope of never meeting again.

It is like an ember that keeps glowing in one corner of our heart, which keeps reminding that it is real, it is persistent, it cannot die.

How can you expect a child to grieve? A child who doesn’t even know this word, who is suddenly thrown into the sea and expected to swim!

How can you tell a child to shed tears and empathize with those who want to glorify grief?

‘How dare you smile or laugh’…people remind us and compel us to keep the grief alive in our heart.

I can recollect a feeling of emptiness, of loneliness, of guilt encompassing me, shrieking…keep that emotion alive. A reprimand arising out of my heart…dare you not abandon it!

Such is the way of the world or that is what I experienced. Moments of joy were snatched away not just by the dead, who left me behind but even those who were alive because they chose to live in sorrow.Grief quote

Grief is one emotion that can never be suppressed… I learnt this lesson in the prime of my adolescence; it is better to accept it, embrace it and conduct a meaningful dialogue with it.

Give it some time to let it percolate, assess your strength, build it further and emerge emotionally resilient. Only grief can do it. It is only in misery that we learn to become understanding. Our vibes of sensitivity become more functional. We become resistant to judgments.

We learn to live with it.

“Grief is like the ocean; it comes on waves ebbing and flowing. Sometimes the water is calm and sometimes it is overwhelming. All we can do is learn to swim.” – Vicki Harrison

After all the tears and heartbreaking moments of anguish, grief starts diluting itself and steps out. We just have to open the doors and windows to let it ease. Now it re-enters in a new form if we are ready to accept him like a friend.

When I befriended grief it started patting on my back, it sat with me to reassure that it would welcome joy. I was astounded that it too loved to break free. Now both of us enjoy freedom, soar with each other, laughter accompanies us and we have vanquished negative thoughts.

We pour our concerns and tears into poetry, which is all-absorbing and provides us with somber solace.

Grief is our best friend:

It acquaints us with our inner self.

It makes us ponder to understand its nuances.

It makes us wiser and more tolerant.

It reinforces our faith and strength.

It ennobles us.

It introduces us to joy, which lies in little, fleeting moments.

Have you found a friend in grief by accepting it? Do you like this new relationship? I would love to hear your views.

The above extract, adapted from my next book, which is in initial stages, may seem gloomy and out of place but grief is one word that surely touches our lives with its cold hand, at some stage of life.

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Thank you for your support. Please add your valuable comments, they are much appreciated.

Balroop Singh.