Transitions #Poetry Challenge

Pixaby images

colors
rock our cradle
we are bubbles of joy
life sounds sublime initially
carefree!

yellow 
and green mingle
to welcome the first steps
butterflies add charm and magic
gleeful!

 crimson
flutters young hearts
new passion reigns supreme
love gets a new connotation
blissful!

Darker 
shades permeate
Black and gray dominate
Shadows hover around to scare
eerie.

ashen 
and pale jolt us
but life keeps on smiling
if we let the woeful clouds pass
souls merge.
© Balroop Singh

Thanks to Colleen for a weekly TankaTuesday challenge, which asks for any syllabic form based on the theme prompt. This week’s theme is “Transitions.” I’ve again tried a new form of poetry.
This poem is a Crown Cinquain, five stanzas, each with syllable count of 2/4/6/8/2.
Thanks for the inspiration Colleen.

For more poetry: click here to hear Magical Whispers

Have you checked my latest release? – Slivers: Chiseled Poetry

#Photoprompt #Shadorma #Poetry Challenge

Photo selected by D. Wallace Peach from Pixaby.com

cameras
around the time frame
scan your face,
instruct you
they speak just in syllables
magic portal yawns

red door opens
just for a second
wide enough 
to push you
a dark capsule swallows
sky and earth merge here

a new realm 
inequalities
of all kinds
melt at once
liquid pours perpetually
a preordained drowning!
© Balroop Singh

Thanks to Colleen M. Chesebro for #TankaTuesday weekly poetry challenge to nudge some creative writing.

For more poetry: click here to hear Magical Whispers

Have you checked my latest release? – Slivers: Chiseled Poetry

How to Nurture Love for Poetry #NationalPoetryMonth

Symbolism and words

Poetry is said to be good for the soul, as it soothes our emotions, helps us dig deeper into  thoughts and dreams and makes us discern the aesthetic pleasures around us. If you avoid poetry and prefer thrillers, probably you have never been exposed to the love of reading a good poem.

Nurturing the love for poetry starts in childhood. If you are a parent, read a poem everyday with your child. Ask the child what s/he likes about that poem. If the child likes it, don’t hestitate to read it everyday but add another one. Begin with simple and short poems.

Encourage your child to collect little poems and make a scrapbook. You can browse poems for kids online. Think about your favorite poets and poems you liked as a child or as a youngster. Share those thoughts with your children or siblings. Discuss what makes you like poetry.

Encourage your child to write a short poem. Bette A. Stevens offers excellent guidelines for writing haiku (an unrhymed poetic form consisting of 17 syllables arranged in three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively.)

Why is poetry disliked? Whenever this question haunts me, I try to look back to search some answers. The only poetry we were exposed to in schools, was the rhymes and that too in Kindergarten.

While reading story books is stressed upon but good poetry books are not easily available. Either they haven’t been written or their level is too high to be understood by children.

Some poems that we meet in textbooks fail to inculcate the love for reading of more poetry though ‘Mr. Nobody’ stayed in my thoughts and I love it even today.

Here is the fun poem: I wish more such poems could be written!

Mr. Nobody

I know a funny little man,
As quiet as a mouse,
Who does the mischief that is done
In everybody’s house!
There’s no one ever sees his face,
And yet we all agree
That every plate we break was cracked
By Mr. Nobody.

’Tis he who always tears out books,
Who leaves the door ajar,
He pulls the buttons from our shirts,
And scatters pins afar;
That squeaking door will always squeak,
For prithee, don’t you see,
We leave the oiling to be done
By Mr. Nobody.

He puts damp wood upon the fire
That kettles cannot boil;
His are the feet that bring in mud,
And all the carpets soil.
The papers always are mislaid;
Who had them last, but he?
There’s no one tosses them about
But Mr. Nobody.

The finger marks upon the door
By none of us are made;
We never leave the blinds unclosed,
To let the curtains fade.
The ink we never spill; the boots
That lying round you see
Are not our boots,—they all belong
To Mr. Nobody.
– Walter de la Mare

Whenever a door squeaks, I think of Mr. Nobody!

Poems for children and middle schoolers have to be short and simple. The following poem by Robert Frost could speak to them if imagery is explained by the teacher:

Fire and Ice

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.
– Robert Frost

Love for poetry is also connected with how well the poems are taught by our English teachers. Some just read them and inspire children to analyze. While it may be good for developing critical thinking, discussions have to follow to share the opinion of others.

Creative writing workshops in schools that focus on poetry writing develop sensibilities at an early age. Do you have any memories of writing poetry in your school?

In honor of National Poetry Month, two of my poetry books are being offered for just 0.99 cents. If you love poetry, grab your copy now. Thank you. Please share this post at your favorite social networks.

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Poetry
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Expectations Of Writers And Readers

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When a writer puts the first word on paper; a dream world opens before him, a world that ignites his creativity as well as fantasy. Former makes him produce his magnificent work but the latter makes him a celebrity overnight (in his dreams.)

You may be writing out of creative compulsions or the satisfaction of venting your voice could be your trigger, most writers harbor a secret wish – to be read, to be reviewed and admired. Admiration comes easily but you never know how hypocritical it is. Reality hits you when you see how much money you are earning from your books.

You may stay determined with the cliché – “never give up” but when you read others’ work and feel that many average books are overflowing with 5 star reviews; you wonder whether something is wrong with you when you feel like dropping a book that has been fetching 5 stars… (for whatever reasons!)

However, there are critical readers too. They know what they want, their discerning eye can’t be escaped. Their expectations are immeasurable.

You think you have the most original ideas, you would be the best seller but your readers feel you ramble, you repeat and the setting of your story is vague or the title of your book is a misnomer.youtuber-2838945__340

You think you write perfect English, your beta readers are excellent helpers and you have a long list of friends under the acknowledgements but your readers find typos and structural errors in your book.

Each reader expects an amazing book; he doesn’t want to think what were your compulsions or exhaustions. He doesn’t want to buy your excuses. He doesn’t want to digest your lack of finances for hiring an astute editor. All readers are not writers and they have every right to judge your book according to their own parameters. All readers are not kind enough to overlook imperfections in the plot, style of writing or characterization.

Then there are writers who focus on money. They write just what sells. The day writing becomes a chore for you, you are no longer a writer, and you become a businessperson, churning out book after book, devoid of any real emotion.

Your writing may not be “like a windowpane” or “impenetrable fog” but it has to be an “exploration,” it has to “enrich the life of those who read it.” If it is just inconsequential chitchat between a few characters, going around in circles, you may befool a few readers but not all.

Robert Frost’s definition is worth pondering: “The ear is the only true writer and the only true reader. I know people who read without hearing the sentence sounds and they were the fastest readers. Eye readers we call them. They get the meaning by glances. But they are bad readers because they miss the best part of what a good writer puts into his work.”

Are you an “eye reader” or a critical reader? Do you drop a book if you don’t like it? What do you expect from your readers?

Thank you for reading this. Please share your valuable reflections, they are much appreciated.

If you have liked this post, please share it at your favorite social networks.

Balroop Singh.

 

I Am Soul #PoetryBook

Please welcome my blogger friend and a poet par excellence Yecheilyah (e-SEE-li-yah, affectionately nicknamed EC) who shares an excerpt from her inspiring and soulful poetry book, ‘I Am Soul.’ BLOG TOUR

WHY I WRITE BLACK

Because flowers grow in strange places
like tattered pieces of wood and recycled paper.
Because history is frostbitten
and winter refuses to be comforted by the sun.
Bluish-white and numbed pain
cold skin and a prickling feeling.
Because the sky don’t stay dark forever,
but light ain’t taught in history class.
Because some skirts
are too heavy
to lift without permission.
Because Dust Tracks on The Road
was subtracted chapters.
Because some truths
are too big to sacrifice
on American altars.
Because Zora died broke
and Nina died sad.
Because their voices still sing.
Because strange fruit still swings.
Because ignorance in this world
is worth more than rubies
and diamond gems
are a worthless treasure.
Because no one has picked up the pieces
of truth
underneath the rubble
of bombed out churches
on 16th Street
Because little girls ain’t little girls no more
Little girls ain’t nothing
but crushed bones
and melted skin,
A strike of disobedience
against premeditated sin.
Because hope is stronger than despair.
Because freedom is worth more
than all the
raisins in the sun.
© YecheilyEC

Bio:
Yecheilyah (e-SEE-li-yah, affectionately nicknamed EC) is an Author, Blogger, and Poet and lives in Marietta, GA with her wonderful husband. She has been writing poetry since she was twelve years old and joined the UMOJA Poetry Society in High School where she learned to perfect her craft. In 2010, at 23 years-old, Yecheilyah published her first collection of poetry and in 2014, founded Literary Korner Publishing and The PBS blog where she enjoys helping other authors through her blog interviews and book reviews. The PBS Blog has been named among Reedsy’s Best Book Review blogs of 2017 and 2018 and has helped many authors in their writing journey. I am Soul is her fourth collection of poetry.

Fun Facts about Yecheilyah:
She loves to laugh, and her favorite comedy TV show is Blackish
She is originally from Chicago, IL
She’s been married to her husband 8 years, together for 11 years
She believes eggs make everything better
She is a twin
She is addicted to reading and new notebooks
Her favorite desert is ice cream

I am Soul is now available on Amazon, for iTunes, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and ScribdClick Here to choose your retailer.

 

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2841 Greenbriar Pkwy SW
Atlanta, GA 30331

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Thank you for your support. Please share your valuable reflections about the poem.

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