How to Nurture Love for Poetry #NationalPoetryMonth

Symbolism and words

Poetry is said to be good for the soul, as it soothes our emotions, helps us dig deeper into  thoughts and dreams and makes us discern the aesthetic pleasures around us. If you avoid poetry and prefer thrillers, probably you have never been exposed to the love of reading a good poem.

Nurturing the love for poetry starts in childhood. If you are a parent, read a poem everyday with your child. Ask the child what s/he likes about that poem. If the child likes it, don’t hestitate to read it everyday but add another one. Begin with simple and short poems.

Encourage your child to collect little poems and make a scrapbook. You can browse poems for kids online. Think about your favorite poets and poems you liked as a child or as a youngster. Share those thoughts with your children or siblings. Discuss what makes you like poetry.

Encourage your child to write a short poem. Bette A. Stevens offers excellent guidelines for writing haiku (an unrhymed poetic form consisting of 17 syllables arranged in three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively.)

Why is poetry disliked? Whenever this question haunts me, I try to look back to search some answers. The only poetry we were exposed to in schools, was the rhymes and that too in Kindergarten.

While reading story books is stressed upon but good poetry books are not easily available. Either they haven’t been written or their level is too high to be understood by children.

Some poems that we meet in textbooks fail to inculcate the love for reading of more poetry though ‘Mr. Nobody’ stayed in my thoughts and I love it even today.

Here is the fun poem: I wish more such poems could be written!

Mr. Nobody

I know a funny little man,
As quiet as a mouse,
Who does the mischief that is done
In everybody’s house!
There’s no one ever sees his face,
And yet we all agree
That every plate we break was cracked
By Mr. Nobody.

’Tis he who always tears out books,
Who leaves the door ajar,
He pulls the buttons from our shirts,
And scatters pins afar;
That squeaking door will always squeak,
For prithee, don’t you see,
We leave the oiling to be done
By Mr. Nobody.

He puts damp wood upon the fire
That kettles cannot boil;
His are the feet that bring in mud,
And all the carpets soil.
The papers always are mislaid;
Who had them last, but he?
There’s no one tosses them about
But Mr. Nobody.

The finger marks upon the door
By none of us are made;
We never leave the blinds unclosed,
To let the curtains fade.
The ink we never spill; the boots
That lying round you see
Are not our boots,—they all belong
To Mr. Nobody.
– Walter de la Mare

Whenever a door squeaks, I think of Mr. Nobody!

Poems for children and middle schoolers have to be short and simple. The following poem by Robert Frost could speak to them if imagery is explained by the teacher:

Fire and Ice

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.
– Robert Frost

Love for poetry is also connected with how well the poems are taught by our English teachers. Some just read them and inspire children to analyze. While it may be good for developing critical thinking, discussions have to follow to share the opinion of others.

Creative writing workshops in schools that focus on poetry writing develop sensibilities at an early age. Do you have any memories of writing poetry in your school?

In honor of National Poetry Month, two of my poetry books are being offered for just 0.99 cents. If you love poetry, grab your copy now. Thank you. Please share this post at your favorite social networks.

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The Song Of A Stream

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Sue Vincent’s #photoprompt

This image evokes the memory of a sagacious song that each bounce of water whispered into my ears; the unforgettable lyrics… having the quality of a lilting and enchanting tune, unique in its form.

As the stream gurgled down with glee, I tried to sing with it and soak in those fleeting moments of unexpected joy. I marveled at its sparkling surge and luminosity that never loses its sheen.

I admired the freedom that nature endows us with!

I wondered at the message that was written on its ripples, the message of surging ahead, of making its own way through the impediments, of singing happily despite the turbulences created by the unforeseen circumstances.

Isn’t life like that? Can we detach it from water, its lifeline?
Is it imaginable without the rocky surface and inevitable incidence?
Can we stop its flow and speed? Can we evade change?
Its childlike innocence, its radiance, its twists and twirls remind us of little joys of life. Its depth and fortitude speak about the stormy weather, which is knitted into the fabric of our lives.

I have spent countless days in the lap of Nature, watching the movement of clouds and the orange glow that spreads across the sky, dancing in the sudden hailstorm, sliding in the snow, walking in the woods and deriving solace from the whispering pines but the impact of that song, which I had heard thirty years ago is far more profound and eternal. Some memories are indelible.
© Balroop Singh

Thanks to Sue Vincent for an inspiring Thursday #photoprompt Choice.

You can click here for my poetry.

Check my latest book release: Moments We Love

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Hear the Whisper

Bare branches
Bare branches peep through my window
Stand tall to inspire;
Rocks that I admire
As they love with fervor

Bare beauty that illuminates
At the command of Mother Nature
I watch from my cozy couch
How they entangle and crouch

Bare branches shiver and smile
Breathing eerie calm;
Waiting for their singing pals
When sublime spring calls

Watch how they weep
Bearing snow and rain
Wind whirls tender twigs
Not a word of pain!

Watch how they lit up
And say adieu to sun
But shimmer with delight
In moonlight!

Did you hear their whisper?
© Balroop Singh

You can click here for more poetry.

Check my latest book release: Moments We Love

Thank you for your support. If  you have liked this poem, please share it at your favorite social networks.

Balroop Singh.

This is also Love!

Love is a sublime emotion, which is only understood when we have crossed the pitfalls of infatuation; when we stop gazing at its dazzling light; when we learn to look within and when it has taught us its value. I have written about it many times. Here is an excerpt from one of my poems:

“True love keeps smiling in our eyes
Like a fountain that never dries
It instills hope, respect, patience
The journey of love is so elating.”
© Balroop Singh

Recently I stumbled upon a book of poetry that acquainted me with another aspect of LOVE; not because it came back (which is so rare) but because it validated my belief that I have shared in the opening lines.

71A6gYNJjwL._AC_SL260_This poetry was written when the poet was a youngster. It made no sense to cling to those painful memories, so she abandoned it in some dark corner of the house to move forward. Many years later, her dad found the original script and gave it to her. That’s how these poems saw the light of the day to enlighten many minds. Eeva Lancaster shares the story of her life in the introductory part of this book.

The good news is that her love came back to her after 10 years!

MY REVIEW:

In Loving You – A Journey of Love and Self Discovery by Eeva Lancaster highlights that love is not just elation, not just the ecstasy of holding each other to soak in the blissful moments; it is heartbreaking too, it drives you almost crazy, pushing you into the shadows with “ghost” like existence. Emotionally charged and realistic, these poems bring out profound realities of relationships – anguish, yearning, heartbreak, loneliness, and emptiness – each emotion has been exquisitely captured by Eeva. The passion of a youngster shines through her verses.

Isn’t it ironic that love, the most powerful emotion acquaints you with the “beauty of surrender,” makes you feel like “a reed so soft and bending!” Some poems inspire to move on, conveying a subtle message that clinging on to somebody who doesn’t acknowledge your love is futile. If we could peep through the drapes of present, if we could escape the pain – an essential part of life – we would cease to be emotional and creative. Eeva’s poetry suggests that the journey toward self-discovery lies through cauldrons of circumstances, which may smile at you at a later stage. I salute this brave poet for sharing the story of her life.

© Balroop Singh

Check my latest book release: Moments We Love

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#NewYearWishes

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Looking back was never my way
New dreams drown me
Deeper I go into the sea
Keeping my eyes at the horizon

Swimming was never my sport
Yet I wade into waters
Splashing around for fun
Waves of words comfort me

Flanked by those waves
I smile at the new dawn
Each one brings love and peace
I wish the same for you.
© Balroop Singh

Wishing a wonderful 2020 to all my blogger friends and readers.

You can click here for more poetry.

Check my latest book release: Moments We Love

Thank you for your support. If  you have liked this poem, please share it at your favorite social networks.

Balroop Singh.