Meet poet, Balroop Singh, and a review of Magical Whispers

Meet me today at writingtoberead.com, where I talk about my favorite poets. Also read Robbie’s fabulous review of Magical Whispers there!

Writing to be Read

Treasuring Poetry

Today, I have the pleasure of featuring talented poet, Balroop Singh, as my Treasuring Poetry guest. Balroop has shared some lovely thoughts about poetry and her favourite poems. My review of her latest book, Magical Whispers, is included at the end of the post.

You can find out more about Balroop Singh and her poetry on her lovely blog here: https://balroop2013.wordpress.com/about/

What is your favourite poem?

How can you have one poem as a favorite? They have been changing with my growing years. From Rumi to Rudyard Kipling to Maya Angelou, poetry has always evoked images of romanticism, realism and Sufism and I got carried away with those images depending on the phase of my life.

As a youngster, I liked ‘Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening’ by Robert Frost. It acquainted me with the beautiful images and simple style of writing a poem, inspired me…

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Book Review: Magical Whispers by Balroop Singh

Thanks to Lauren for an admirable review of my latest collection of poetry – Magical Whispers.

Baydreamer

My 5-star review:

I have been a fan of Balroop Singh’s poetry for many years now. She has a magical way of weaving words together that mesmerize and inspire, which explains the spot-on title for her new poetry collection, Magical Whispers.

This beautiful edition is divided into two segments: Magical Whispers and Whispers of Life. The first segment effortlessly captivates as we read verses that truly convey Singh’s love and connection to Mother Nature. Since I am an avid hiker and backpacker, I resonate fully with each line and image the author paints with her enchanting poetic style. The poems that stand out for me are Stream Whispers, Celestial Lake, Love is Love, and Whispers of Soul.

The second segment touches on various components of life such as: love, dreams, sorrow, fear, and perseverance. Singh’s character holds a strong conviction that although life may be full of shadows, light always…

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Do You Still Like Printed books?

Some of my friends like print editions. The above link is for them.

There was a time I loved to hold paperbacks and hard cover books, as they were the only ones I knew. I scoffed at the idea of buying a kindle and when my daughter offered to buy one for me, I laughed it off with the same old phrase – ‘I like to turn pages of books and feel their fragrance!’

Despite my hubris, my daughter did gift a Kindle to me, when she heard me complaining about the lampshades hiding the light, and saw me struggling with less light on the book that I tried to read at bedtime. Slowly I fell in love with my Kindle and discovered many more plus points of carrying it with me all the time. I was amazed how arrogance melts at our feet, as we accept changes around us.

I had to detach myself from physical books when I chose to move closer to my grandkids. I donated all my collection, reassuring myself that many more people would be able to read them – the only positive thought that gave me the strength to part with the classics I had hoarded for years. I realized the reality of the word – “detachment.” I chose people over books though I love both.

I wanted to put everyone behind a Kindle but some of my friends from India still want printed books and keep asking me: “When is your paperback coming?”

Almost all my books are now available in print. Click on the global link of my author page to look at all the editions. 

This year, my younger daughter gifted me three credits for choosing a book of the month from her favorite site and I had no choice (as it was a Mother’s Day gift) but order a hardcover every month. I kept thinking how would I read them! I am glad I could but I kept tapping at the page each time I had to turn the page!

They may be beautiful but now I have grown out of paperbacks. Hardcovers still allure me but they are heavier and can’t be carried in my handbag. I love my Kindle.

What about you?

Thank you for reading. Thanks to Miriam, a wonderful blogger friend, for creating the above image of Magical Whispers.

I owe gratitude to all my author buddies and blogger friends who shared Magical Whispers at their blogs during the promotional week.

You can click here for my poetry.

Balroop Singh.

How to Nurture Love for Poetry #NationalPoetryMonth

Symbolism and words

Poetry is said to be good for the soul, as it soothes our emotions, helps us dig deeper into  thoughts and dreams and makes us discern the aesthetic pleasures around us. If you avoid poetry and prefer thrillers, probably you have never been exposed to the love of reading a good poem.

Nurturing the love for poetry starts in childhood. If you are a parent, read a poem everyday with your child. Ask the child what s/he likes about that poem. If the child likes it, don’t hestitate to read it everyday but add another one. Begin with simple and short poems.

Encourage your child to collect little poems and make a scrapbook. You can browse poems for kids online. Think about your favorite poets and poems you liked as a child or as a youngster. Share those thoughts with your children or siblings. Discuss what makes you like poetry.

Encourage your child to write a short poem. Bette A. Stevens offers excellent guidelines for writing haiku (an unrhymed poetic form consisting of 17 syllables arranged in three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively.)

Why is poetry disliked? Whenever this question haunts me, I try to look back to search some answers. The only poetry we were exposed to in schools, was the rhymes and that too in Kindergarten.

While reading story books is stressed upon but good poetry books are not easily available. Either they haven’t been written or their level is too high to be understood by children.

Some poems that we meet in textbooks fail to inculcate the love for reading of more poetry though ‘Mr. Nobody’ stayed in my thoughts and I love it even today.

Here is the fun poem: I wish more such poems could be written!

Mr. Nobody

I know a funny little man,
As quiet as a mouse,
Who does the mischief that is done
In everybody’s house!
There’s no one ever sees his face,
And yet we all agree
That every plate we break was cracked
By Mr. Nobody.

’Tis he who always tears out books,
Who leaves the door ajar,
He pulls the buttons from our shirts,
And scatters pins afar;
That squeaking door will always squeak,
For prithee, don’t you see,
We leave the oiling to be done
By Mr. Nobody.

He puts damp wood upon the fire
That kettles cannot boil;
His are the feet that bring in mud,
And all the carpets soil.
The papers always are mislaid;
Who had them last, but he?
There’s no one tosses them about
But Mr. Nobody.

The finger marks upon the door
By none of us are made;
We never leave the blinds unclosed,
To let the curtains fade.
The ink we never spill; the boots
That lying round you see
Are not our boots,—they all belong
To Mr. Nobody.
– Walter de la Mare

Whenever a door squeaks, I think of Mr. Nobody!

Poems for children and middle schoolers have to be short and simple. The following poem by Robert Frost could speak to them if imagery is explained by the teacher:

Fire and Ice

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.
– Robert Frost

Love for poetry is also connected with how well the poems are taught by our English teachers. Some just read them and inspire children to analyze. While it may be good for developing critical thinking, discussions have to follow to share the opinion of others.

Creative writing workshops in schools that focus on poetry writing develop sensibilities at an early age. Do you have any memories of writing poetry in your school?

In honor of National Poetry Month, two of my poetry books are being offered for just 0.99 cents. If you love poetry, grab your copy now. Thank you. Please share this post at your favorite social networks.

Click to buy

Poetry
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Author Spotlight: Balroop Singh (Moments We Love)

I share only few posts at Facebook and I happened to share this one. I am amazed at the response from my old friends and students who still remember me fondly. Many thanks to James, an accomplished author and a wonderful blogger friend for giving me this opportunity to show my achievements. Please hop on to James’ blog to read the full interview, where I also share excerpts from my latest book – ‘Moments We Love.’